29 August 2016

Mitsubishi LCV Production By Model : 1997-2014

Mitsubishi Motors may have lost its Fuso truck division but it retained its light commercial vehicles. As the extreme right column below shows, they have achieved - for the time here under consideration - roughly from 20-30% of all production for MMC. So let's look at each model:

The Triton (L200) pick-up truck is the largest within the LCV range, with about two thirds of total units made. Some may call it a compact pick-up but for me it's medium sized. I'm sure it must have been a vital profit earner for the company. It started production in 1978 and the 5th generation was introduced in 2015 (pictured below).


The Delica (L300) cargo van and mini bus has also been a popular LCV, especially in the Asia and Pacific region. It commenced being made in 1968 and the first three generations were both a tradition van style as well as a pick-up version. The current model is the 5th generation which has been around since 2007. Production is holding up well considering its age.

Mitsubishi also does the Colt T120SS mini pick-up, based on a Suzuki model and made in Indonesia. It is sold only in certain Asian markets. The Minicab (L100) was a Kei sized van from 1966 forward and it was also a mini pick-up too. It seems it was again just for the Asian region. Why production dipped for 2014 is strange, but I don't know much about these Asia only models. Finally the Town Box was a high roofed Kei van produced for 12 years but now discontinued. it was made for the Japanese market.

Yr Triton Delica Colt - Minicab Town Total %
L300 L300 T120 L100 - Box
97 109,323 109,861 18,669 79,325 - 317,178 22
98 89,401 80,035 1,913 71,839 2,261 245,449 18
99 92,284 54,922 3,433 70,367 18,037 239,043 18
00 119,719 61,172 6,768 62,770 10,394 260,823 19
01 107,933 41,869 10,416 56,245 9,601 226,064 19
02 122,616 44,279 15,268 45,899 4,949 233,011 18
03 117,696 41,861 17,568 72,125 5,561 254,811 21
04 146,877 47,850 22,704 68,197 4,262 289,890 27
05 158,063 45,089 18,192 67,179 4,143 292,666 25
06 169,820 46,494 5,372 65,251 3,357 290,294 24
07 189,037 67,206 10,944 57,318 10,105 334,610 25
08 162,178 48,955 12,201 52,106 8,241 283,681 27
09 111,336 49,953 9,744 48,206 3,892 223,131 26
10 163,342 61,860 19,392 52,134 3,086 299,814 28
11 173,463 64,258 26,225 60,926 2,542 327,414 32
12 209,160 62,212 31,473 61,350 - 364,195 32
13 164,527 66,249 33,746 48,655 - 313,177 25
14 171,005 55,916 29,184 1,042 - 257,147 20

Summary: LCV production is based around the Triton pick-up, the only model among these with any global reach. Mitsubishi is strong in Asia and that is where the emphasis has been for its LCV vehicles.

Data source: Mitsubishi Motors.

28 August 2016

Italian Car Production (Brand) - 1951-60


I wish more associations were as open as ANFIA. It allows us to peer into the past and see how things were. From it we see the Italian car industry rising from the ashes of WWII. It's surprising how quickly things picked up from the wreckage wrought on Europe not many years earlier.

Fiat of course was the mainstay of the automotive industrial revival, accounting for 84% of the volume for this ten year period. Lancia started as the second brand but was passed by Alfa Romeo through the decade. Autobianchi was part owned by Fiat and made slightly pricier cars than the equivalent Fiat model. Innocenti just started in 1960 making BMC vehicles under licence.

Ferrari and Maserati were of a similar size and the latter just edged ahead by 1960. Iso made the Isetta Bubble Car although the figures her don't quite add up to me.

Over 2.8 million cars were made, Fiat making just over 2.5 million of them. Things were looking better as commerce got back to normal and and more people were able to consider buying a new car.

Yr Fiat Alfa Lancia Auto - Inno- Mas - Ferr - ISO Other Total
Romeo bianchi centi erati ari


51 108,889 1,420 8,614 - - 26 83 - 235 119,267
52 101,659 3,514 8,034 - - 6 90 - 350 113,653
53 132,061 3,477 7,658 - - 20 85 - 297 143,598
54 163,561 3,826 11,782 - - 61 66 1,298 272 180,866
55 218,082 5,919 6,572 - - 111 73 105 126 230,988
56 262,143 11,748 5,746 - - 119 110 17 26 279,909
57 290,672 16,675 10,269 750 - 72 122 - 231 318,791
58 327,049 20,580 10,239 10,898 - 105 149 - 366 369,386
59 412,682 32,089 12,130 12,655 - 249 248 - 621 470,674
60 500,527 57,870 21,022 14,787 870 402 306 - 139 595,923
Av 251,733 15,712 10,207 9,773 870 117 133 473 266 282,306

Data source: ANFIA

Brand Series - Uber Luxury


We now look at the final in the series, the über luxury marques. This sort of car sells to people who may view the purchase of a Rolls Royce in the same way as most of us would buying a sandwich for lunch. In other words, for those whom spending money isn't an issue they need to fret about. They may also own several cars.

Most luxury brands are doing very well but it isn't as easy making a success of things as we may think. Boxes have to be ticked. So what are the necessary things to get right?

Brand image. This is the first one and the most important. Buying a fabulous car that no one has heard of or holds little cachet won't work. Daimler tried with Maybach but the well heeled didn't fall for it.

Modern. The marque is critical, but customers still want up to date styling and technology. Aston Martin has struggled to keep up with replacing car platforms but are now dealing with that. They got away with it but a few more years of the 'same old, same old' and they would have suffered.

Trends. Even for this sort of car, being one step ahead of the competition is very helpful. Suddenly it has been realised that SUV über luxury is 'in'. Bentley were an early entrant with the Bentayga and other are rushing into the segment with haste. Miss the trend and it will be costly.

Summary: I have a confession to make. I don't live in the rarefied air of people that buy über luxury items. To me, buying a new car of any description is a major deal. I even strive to cultivate simple tastes and value a modest lifestyle. I am lucky enough to live in a country where such is attainable, without fear of poverty.

So am I qualified to write about this subject? One thing I do know is that selling 'luxury' has to be done right.