30 December 2011

Car Market Switzerland: 1960's


Things were so different back in the 60's in the Swiss car market. GM Euro makes Opel and Vauxhall were both imported. Fords were from Germany, Britain and the US. BMC brands still had credibility and sold well. Chrysler sales were mainly Simca, but also newly acquired Sunbeam from Britain and US models too. NSU was still to be absorbed by VW into the Audi marque. Triumph were part of Leyland, soon to become the new BLMC conglomerate. The same applied to Rover/Land Rover. How things changed in the next few years.

Below is listed sales for 1964, brand/sales/share:

Opel-Vaux 24,473 18.3%
VW 22,604 16.9%
Ford 14,186 10.6%
BMC 11,427 8.6%
Fiat 10,019 7.5%
Chrysler 9,133 6.8%
Peugeot 6,172 4.6%
Renault 5,929 4.4%
Citroen 5,320 4.0%
Volvo 3,256 2.4%
Mercedes 3,055 2.3%
GM US 2,820 2.1%
Auto Union 2,705 2.0%
Triumph 1,799 1.3%
Alfa Romeo 1,761 1.3%
BMW 1,434 1.1%
Land Rover 818 0.6%
NSU 742 0.6%
Lancia 512 0.4%
Jaguar 500 0.4%
AMC 464 0.3%
Porsche 406 0.3%
Rover 358 0.3%
Saab 266 0.2%
Other 3,476 2.6%
Total 133,635

There are no Japanese makes in the above list. That invasion started at the end of the 1960's and quickly made strong inroads thereafter.

Data Source: Schweiz Bundesamt für Statistik (BFS)
Pics: Simca - http://sv.wikipedia.org
Opel - www.velocityjournal.com

26 December 2011

The Rover 600


This was a car I really liked, although it wasn't as successful as it deserved. The 600 was basically a Honda Accord, which wasn't a bad thing. It was tweaked so as to have a British feel to it, and that worked quite well. For European tastes it was probably too Japanese. When I was on holiday in the UK, I met an American chap who had a rental 600. I asked him his opinion of the car and he loved it. He wanted to buy one back home, but they were not exported there - at Honda's insistence.

I don't know if it replaced another car, but if it did, I'm picking it carried on from the Montego. The Rover 600 started to be produced in 1993, the Montego finishing in 1994. The six years of production figures are as below, followed by UK sales:

1993 30,394
1994 54,603
1995 61,518
1996 43,701
1997 40,291
1998 40,815
Total 271,322

1993 14,454
1994 23,397
1995 24,200
1996 19,900
1997 22,300
1998 ?

So it was a good car, but lacked in prestige and dynamics. It was replaced by the Rover 75, but that model came a bit too late and the 75 never even matched the 600's production volume.

Pics: www.autoplenum.de
Sales figures: http://bestsellingcarsblog.com/

25 December 2011

Car Market Spain: 1960's

Getting guaranteed car sales data for Spain is difficult. From what I did find, the market back in the 60's was limited to brands made within the country. In 1961, less than 70,000 cars were sold so not a market big enough to support many manufacturing plants. Sales grew well and by 1969, perhaps 380,000 cars were sold.

Below are the sales as accurate I could get for 1969:


Make/Sales/Share
1 Seat 222,000 58.8%
2 Renault 73,000 19.4%
3 Simca 28,500 7.5%
4 Citroen 22,500 5.9%
Others 31,800 8.4%
Total 380,000


Some may wonder about the brand Seat - pronounced 'say - at'. Well, when the Spanish government decided to have a local brand, both Fiat and VW sought to be the alliance partner. Fiat won and by 1950, the first Seat cars came off the assembly line. Then a falling out in the early 1980s between the Spanish government and Fiat led to Fiat leaving the venture and VW quickly moved to replace them.

Today, Seat fights with other brands for market leadership and its share is about 9%. The Spanish car buyer has plenty of choice in the car market now. No one brand can command even a 10% share, quite a unique situation.

22 December 2011

Saab Finally In Receivership

Four years ago I wrote an article 'Saab, Will It Survive?' You can see it on http://tiny.cc/pa0tc
In it I concluded: So while it would be a shame if they went the way of the Dodo, it's only GM that is keeping them from joining that hapless bird.

Well GM did indeed give up on it, yet a certain Mr Muller thought he could save it. Unfortunately, he didn't have nearly enough money to do so. I am not even sure if money could have got it back to profitability. It seems all over now anyway.

It deserved to end with the GM decision to pull out. All that is happened since is workers and suppliers have not often been paid, adding to their stress. New dealers have signed on and spent money doing up dealerships, only to be thousands out of pocket now. I get the idea it has cost the Swedish tax payer quite a bit also. Anyone trying to resurrect the marque now would be wasting their time unless it ended up in China, and GM do not seem to be allowing that to happen.

The brand did not keep up with the play and perhaps GM must take the responsibility for that. Some will mourn the passing of Saab, others will not notice or care. Saab's of earlier years were worth saving, the ones of today not so. RIP Saab.

Pic: http://www.mclellansautomotive.com/literature/items/saab/b20905-saab-1968-brochure.php

18 December 2011

Car Market UK: 1980's


The 80's set the pattern for the future until today. Ford made top spot secure, GM Vauxhall over doubled its share through the decade to take second spot in 1989 from what was now Rover Group. The former giant of the UK car industry BMC/BLMC was steadily losing its share, never to come back. Jaguar was sold to Ford too. Peugeot's take over of Chrysler UK had given it the impetus to go from 1.2% in 1981 to 6% in '89, from 13th to fourth.

Rank/Brand/Sales/Share
1 Ford 608,600 26.5%
2 Vauxhall 349,900 15.2%
3 Rover 312,600 13.6%
4 Peugeot 139,000 6.0%
5 Nissan 138,450 6.0%
6 VW 108,800 4.7%
7 Renault 88,100 3.8%
8 Volvo 81,700 3.6%
9 Fiat 70,175 3.0%
10 Citroen 66,400 2.9%
11 BMW 48,900 2.1%
12 Toyota 42,400 1.8%
13 Mercedes 28,350 1.2%
14 Lada 28,050 1.2%
15 Honda 27,000 1.2%
16 Mazda 22,725 1.0%
17 Audi 18,960 0.8%
18 Jaguar 14,250 0.6%
19 Skoda 13,600 0.6%
20 Saab 12,100 0.5%
21 Mitsubishi 10,850 0.5%
22 Seat 10,300 0.4%
23 Hyundai 8,600 0.4%
24 Zastava 7,900 0.3%
25 Proton 6,550 0.3%
26 Suzuki 6,000 0.3%
27 Subaru 4,875 0.2%
28 FSO 4,825 0.2%
29 Daihatsu 4,300 0.2%
30 Alfa Romeo 4,100 0.2%
Others 12,800 0.6%
Total 2,300,850

The UK market has been more stable of late after all the upheavals. Rover Group continued to go downward and BMW's purchase failed to stop its UK slide, in fact became effectively its death stroke. European brands benefited much over the ensuing years.

14 December 2011

allaboutcars 2011 Summary

This blog has had quite a year. When it started in September 2007, I had no idea how many people came to view it. In July 2010, Google started giving bloggers a hit count and for the latter six months of 2010, 4,636 hits were recorded, or 773 per month. However, for 2011, there will be about 49,000 hits, or nearly 4,900 per month. That is quite an increase.

What seems most
popular is car sales by country. Car Sales for both Singapore and Germany 2010 - which were blogged in mid January 2011 - were tops for the year.
Where do you come from? Since July 2010 as follows:

USA 19.2%
UK 10.6%
France 5.3%
Germany 3.9%
India 2.9%
Malaysia 2.1%
Others 56%

January 2012 will be a busy blog month for me, with 2011 sales being released in many countries. So please pop in during January (and before of course if you wish) for more of what you especially like.

An association I would especially like to say a big thank you to is Bilsweden for their helpful, efficient service. They are a model that other similar associations should aspire to.

I have kept the blog an advertisement free zone. It is a hobby and a pleasure, not a business. There is too much commercialism in the world as it is.

For those who do visit, it is nice to have you along. You don't have to be registered to leave a comment and your feedback - whether a positive thought or constructive criticism - is welcome. So please come again and enjoy.

13 December 2011

Car Market UK: 1970's


The 70's didn't see the end of the UK car brands, but they were feeling the strain of under investment therefore reduced competitiveness. BL's market share had over halved from 1969 to 1979. Ford was up slightly but both Chrysler UK and Vauxhall were down somewhat. Import brands were chipping away with much success, as can be seen below when compared with "Car Market UK: 1960's" two blogs ago.

Rank/Brand/Sales/Share
1 Ford 485,600 28.3%
2 BLMC 337,000 19.6%
- Austin/Morris/MG 275,100 16.0%
- Rover 32,150 1.9%
- Triumph 21,700 1.3%
- Jaguar 8,050 0.5%
3 Chrysl UK 119,400 7.0%
4 Vauxhall 112,400 6.5%
5 Nissan 102,400 6.0%
6 Renault 93,500 5.4%
7 Fiat 70,600 4.1%
8 VW 60,100 3.5%
9 Peugeot 38,0000 2.2%
10 Volvo 36,600 2.1%
11 Citroen 34,000 2.0%
12 Toyota 32,200 1.9%
13 Opel 27,200 1.6%
14 Lada 22,300 1.3%
15 Honda 17,850 1.0%
16 Mazda 17,800 1.0%
17 Audi 16,250 0.9%
18 BMW 14,050 0.8%
19 Alfa Rom 13,650 0.8%
20 Mitsubis 10,700 0.6%
21 Skoda 10,250 0.6%
22 Saab 8,975 0.5%
23 Lancia 8,950 0.5%
24 Mercedes 7,900 0.5%
25 FSO 6,525 0.4%
Others 11,750 0.7%
Total 1,716,275

Of the BL brands, Austin/Rover/MG fell from 29.9% to 16.0%, Rover 2.4 to 1.9, Triumph 6.7 to 1.3 and Jaguar from 1.2 to 0.5%. I guess it could be used as a template for managerial incompetence. Anyway, it certainly made for a changing market place.

Pics: http://gallery.brit-cars.com

11 December 2011

COTY Award 2011

For the first time, the all about cars blog is issuing a COTY (car of the year) award. I'm not convinced it will get international recognition or whether the manufacturer will publicly acknowledge this prestigious award. I will write to let the manufacturer know however.

The criteria are as follows:

Released during 2011.
Excellent design and execution.
Moves the car industry forward in some way.
Practical to own.
Other makers will follow.

The winner is:

The Range Rover Evoque.

It is not very often that vehicle comes along that excites, enthuses, looks fabulous and is yet is very practical also. It ticks all the boxes, except the one that says it is in my garage. Others will follow and hopefully car makers will realise that a new car can be much the same as the concept. Well done LR for having the boldness to do something that other companies would not risk. Yet is style really ever a risk?

Runner up: Daylight. Nothing else would get my car of the year if the Evoque had not come along and I expect there won't be too many COTYs from me in the future. Maybe Citroen tries to be a little out there, but not like it used to be. The motor industry is awash with 'play it safe' executives.

08 December 2011

Car Market UK: 1960's


The British car market was very different from today. There were numerous local car brands that dominated the scene. Most of them have gone in such a short time span. Management that lost the will or became apathetic. Workers who forgot how lucky they were to have a job. All sorts of reasons could be given, but the bottom line is a large, successful industry was wasted in a couple of decades. I won't depress you anymore, so here are the sales for the UK in 1969:

1 BLMC 388,500 40.2%
- Austin Morris 278,400 28.8%
- Triumph 64,700 6.7%
- Rover 23,400 2.4%
- Jaguar 11,800 1.2%
- MG 10,300 1.1%

2 Ford 264,000 27.3
3 Vauxhall 112,700 11.7%
4 Chrysl UK 93,400 9.7%
5 VW 20,900 2.2%
6 Fiat 20,800 2.2%
7 Renault 20,100 2.1%
Others 45,000 4.7%
Total 965,400

You can see that the top four were all British producers. So while I see the British car buyer of today as indifferent to what is locally made, back then was very different. They were domestic brands people were proud of and they made some good cars too. Of course it is easy to know what is a local car when the brand is known as such. It is not so easy today when Nissan, for example, is now the country's largest car maker.

Pics: http://gallery.brit-cars.com

06 December 2011

Car Market Germany: 1970's

In the 70's things were changing steadily in the German car market. The top three brands lost ground, especially Ford. Meanwhile, the three premium brands closed in as more affluent German buyers could afford to move up a level of quality. Japanese brands were starting to feature and import European car makers were feeling their presence. In 1979 sales and market share were as below:

1 VW 580,575 22.1%
2 Opel 471,900 18.0%
3 Ford 311,925 11.9%
4 Audi 246,650 9.4%
5 Mercedes 242,850 9.3%
6 BMW 153,925 5.9%
7 Renault 129,750 4.9%
8 Fiat 83,200 3.2%
9 Citroen 50,700 1.9%
10 Talbot 43,950 1.7%
11 Peugeot 41,150 1.6%
12 Toyota 32,500 1.2%
13 Mazda 32,400 1.2%
14 Nissan 32,000 1.2%
15 Honda 28,700 1.1%
16 Volvo 25,000 1.0%
17 Alfa Rom 22,750 0.9%
18 Mitsubishi 20,725 0.8%
19 Porsche 12,000 0.5%
20 GM US 11,425 0.4%
21 FSO 11,275 0.4%
22 Lada 10,650 0.4%
23 BLMC 9,700 0.4%
Sonstige 17,750 0.7%
Insgesamt 2,623,400

Since then, the three German premium brands have taken an even stronger hold while the Asian threat faltered as Japanese brands failed to increase their market share. Overall the German market now seems to be rather predictable, strong support for local product and foreign makes largely on the periphery.

Source: VDA

03 December 2011

Car Market Germany: 1960s


Car purchasing in Germany in the 1960's reflected the growing prosperity. Sales in 1960 were 970,000 but had almost doubled to 1,840,000 by 1969. VW was the biggest brand, capturing 32.5% of the market in 1965. GM Opel was a stable second and got a respectable 25.5% in 1964. Ford kept third spot warm and obtained an 18.3% share in 1966. Mercedes was a regular at 4th, until the merger of NSU and Auto Union into Audi in 1968 pushed past the three pointed star. Fiat and Renault were popular back then and top ten regulars. BMW only had 2.3% of the market in 1965, but in 1966 it purchased the Glas car company and seemed to strengthen after that. The top 20 as best I can determine in 1969 was as follows:

Rank/Brand/Sales/Share
1 Volkswagen 470,000 25.5%
2 Opel 350,000 19.0%
3 Ford 288,000 15.6%
4 Audi 134,500 7.3%
5 Mercedes 127,300 6.9%
6 Fiat 123,500 6.7%
7 Renault 112,500 6.1%
8 BMW 77,000 4.2%
9 Simca 54,000 2.9%
10 Peugeot 26,800 1.5%
11 Citroen 21,700 1.2%
12 NecKar 13,800 0.7%
13 Alfa Romeo 8,800 0.5%
14 DAF 8,500 0.5%
15 Volvo 4,000 0.2%
16 Skoda 3,500 0.2%
17 Porsche 3,100 0.2%
18 Honda 1,700 0.1%
19 Autobianchi 1,200 0.1%
20 Hanomag 1,050 0.1%
Sonstige (Other) 11,000 0.6%
Insgesamt (Total) 1,841,000

The 1960's started with virtually all German cars, but imports made inroads over the decade - mainly French and Italian. I'm unsure as to why British cars didn't figure. Mind you, with a 11,000 others, anything could be lurking there.

Quelle: VDA

30 November 2011

RIP Maybach


BMW and VW wanted into the luxury end of the market. They knew having the correct brand name was as important as making fabulous cars. BMW obtained Rolls Royce, while VW secured Bentley. Mercedes Benz realised it had to get into that stratospheric segment too, but they decided to reintroduce an old, not well known marque. The Maybach brand was born. It probably seemed a better value option to what VW and BMW did. So, did it succeed? If we compare production figures of the three brands below, we will see:

Year Bentley Rolls Royce Maybach
2002 1065 150 50
2003 792 500 700
2004 7690 875 570
2005 9560 700 300
2006 10035 830 300
2007 9975 1,010 240
2008 7675 1,390 320
2009 3600 870 275
2010 4790 3,220 160


You can clearly see that Maybach was never popular, despite MB spending more than a billion Euros getting it going and expecting to make 1,000 units pa. They obviously lost a great deal of money on it. The name was never a good one, the car itself lacked style and distinction. To me it was somewhat tasteless; excess without class. It will cease production in 2013, to be replaced by extra models within the Mercedes Benz 600 series. Does the Mecedes Benz name have the cachet to take on RR or Bentley? I'm thinking no. Meanwhile, the other two marques are doing just fine.

In summary: I don't think Maybach's passing will be mourned by anyone.

27 November 2011

The Minor Car Brand

I wrote an article recently and it featured car sales in Sweden from the 1950's. I asked for help as I was looking for a German brand, not Czech and found nothing. I made a mistake of reading Tj (Tjeckien - Czech) as Ty (Tyskland - Germany). Then I got this email shown below. A big thanks to Roul for his kind assistance:

Dear Mr. RayCee,

With pleasure I follow your blog and read your question about the Minor. I could remember the Minor from some old car magazines I own. In a solid car book I also found some additional information about the brand.

There are several car brands with Minor in the name. It turned out that all those names are related: Jawa Minor. The car was by the way not German, but built in the Czech Republic between 1945 and 1950. Aero was an (sports)aircraft factory, that started (sports)car production in 1928. During WW2 and without de knowledge of the German oppressor it had been working on a new car: the Aero Pony/P and the 1500/R.

In 1947 till the end of the car brand its successor at first was called Aero-Minor II and later on just Minor. It was a car with front wheel drive, a two stroke engine of 616 cm3 that produced 20 HP at 3500 rpm. Back in ‘48 it was the first car who concurred the Sahara dessert without any technical problems!

From that car I could not find a review or a proper photo, but I did find a few (hilarious) Dutch adverts. I include two scans of those adverts in this mail.



The first one is dated 1948 (November 3). A translation of the text: “It came, saw and conquered, this elegant car mend for four persons, with a three speed gearbox, an overdrive and front wheel drive. Hydraulic brakes and independent springs on all four wheels. The exceedingly strong 20 hp engine, economical as a Scotchman (1 -liter- to 12 -kilometers-), can take you over a distance of 90 kilometers. Price f (Dutch Florin) 3535 (in that time a VW Beetle was priced at NFL 3460); from stock deliverable”.


The second one is dated 1950 (October 7): the price has risen and the fuel consumption went down. Together enclosed this advert make you believe that it is your choice: less mileage with your current car or a Minor with a low fuel consumption! It appears to me, that nothing has changed since then, only the number of car brands.

How many cars Minor in totally could sell, I don’t know.

I hope this is (a part of) the information you were looking for.

Regards

Roul

25 November 2011

Jaguar XF Sportbrake (2012) Scooped


The UK car magazine website CAR has released scoop spy shots of the XF Sportbrake coming to a dealer near you from late 2012. Ideally it should have come out years ago, but Jaguar is getting there. This is an important segment in Europe and Jaguar needs to be there. It will soon. To read more and see more pics, please go to: http://tiny.cc/ehxgw

Unfortunately someone at Jaguar left that funny patterned stuff all over the rear. All that does it make it hard to see in detail what they plan to do. Oh well, I guess the photo taken is better than nothing. Even with that faux pas, you can tell it is going to look sleek and stylish as Jaguars must. I like it. Well done Car magazine for being there at the right time.

23 November 2011

The Jaguar XF 2.2 Diesel Across America

Americans have not taken to diesel engined cars. Previously, the engines were noisy, unrefined, smelly and polluting. Today those issues have been minimised or eliminated. I have owned diesel cars and loved the even pulling power and effortless towing capability. I do not and will not own another one until the NZ authorities fix the unfair way diesels are taxed in this country. For everyone else, they are an excellent alternative to hybrids, in fact a better one at the moment.

Below is a of a video recently made of a Jaguar XF being driven across the US. It only filled up four times in 2884 miles (4661 kms) for 62.9 mpg US (8l per 100km). It is worth thinking about America....

18 November 2011

The Wheels Of Life

As we progress in life, our motoring needs do likewise....


So where are you at the moment? Hopefully not the last one at least.

17 November 2011

Car Sales In Sweden From 1950 Forward


The car market in 1950 was very different from today. WW 2 had devastated Europe, although neutral Sweden didn't feel it the same way. What was then Nuffield (mainly Morris) had 6.8% of the Swedish market in 1950 and Austin had 6%.


Standard/Triumph had 5.3%, Rootes (Hillman, Humber etc) had 3%, a German car brand Minor? (can anyone help with that one?) had 1.8%, Jowett 1.1% and Borgward 1.0%. All those names are consigned to history but were strong sellers in Sweden back in 1950.

As for the big guns, their their rank in the Swedish market and sales for that selected year is below. A big thanks to bilsweden:

Year Volvo
VW
Ford
Saab
1950 3 7,400 2 8,250 1 10,100 15 950
1960 1 25,000 2 30,800 4 16,400 5 13,750
1970 1 53,850 4 20,675 5 14,550 2 34,750
1980 1 50,550 3 18,700 5 16,900 2 27,600
1990 1 47,600 5 17,550 2 23,400 3 19,550
2000 1 54,900 3 30,550 4 18,100 2 27,100
2010 1 53,700 2 35,700 4 17,850 13 8,675

Toyota, an unknown brand of 1950, was 3rd in 2010 with 21,600 sales. The Fords of 1950 were 70% sourced from the UK, and as you can see the top selling brand back then. Volvo soon took that spot and has held it for decades now.

The world car industry was so different then. Popular car makes have gone and small or yet to exist makes are now successful. Change is gradual, so scarcely noticed. However, when taking a leap back in time, we realise that things are always changing - and quite radically in some ways.


Jowett pic: http://www.cartype.com/pages/2400/jowett_brochures

13 November 2011

The Trekka

In 1960's New Zealand, there were restrictions on car availability to reduce imports and therefore protect the balance of payments. By locally making an agricultural vehicle, they could make as many as the market would take. This lead to the Trekka vehicle.


The running gear was sourced from communist Czechoslovakian company Skoda. It wasn't any good off road but as a runabout for farmers and tradesmen, it had some merit. A joke going around at the time was that it couldn't pull a skin off a rice pudding*.


It sold in modest numbers until import restrictions were eased, and punters went for superior vehicles that were now available. Between 1967 and 1973, about 2,500 were made, with a few exported to nearby pacific nations.



Often protected markets leads entrepreneurs to create novel ways to get cars to the public, and the Trekka was a fine example of a NZ effort in that regard.

*A rice pudding is a creamy desert which forms a nice skin over the top whilst cooking.

Pic: http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/cars-and-the-motor-industry/2/4

11 November 2011

Car Sales In Finland From 1956



When looking back on car sales for the land of a thousand lakes, you realise how different things were in the 1950s and 1960s. Thanks to the good folk of AKE, we can get a glimpse of that time.

For the period between 1956 and now, the lowest sales were in 1958 when under 14,500 were sold, while it peaked at almost 176,800 in 1989.

Due to not having a local car maker, Finns have no particular allegiance to a brand, as you can see by the frequent changing of the best selling marque in the country. Below is the top car make, followed by the consecutive years it was the leading brand:

Moskvitch 56 57
Volkswagen 58
Moskvitch 59 60 61 62
Ford 63 64
Volkswagen 65 66 67
Ford 68 69 70
Fiat 71 72 73 74 75
Saab 76 77 78
Nissan 79 80 81 82 83 84
Toyota 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93
Opel 94 95 96
Volkswagen 97
Opel 98 99
Toyota 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
Volkswagen 11

Fifteen switches of leader, covering seven makes. It must be some sort of record. Of the brands, have you heard of the Moskvitch? It was a Russian car brand that after WW2, made a car based heavily on the Opel Kadet and they proved to be sturdy, affordable cars. As seen above, it was popular in Finland for a time. Toyota has had the longest stretches of leadership, but is about to lose it to VW this year.

Finland: a fascinating country, with an equally interesting car market.

Pic: http://www.apexreplicas.com.au/road-car/640122613-moskwitch-408e.html

09 November 2011

Car Sales Taiwan: 2010


Taiwan has a car assembly industry, which is protected by import duty. Japanese brands are at the forefront, but Ford does well also. Below is listed total vehicle sales for the island nation.

Rank/Brand/Sales/Incr-decr
1 Toyota 102,500 -9
2 Mitsubishi 41,900 +17
3 Nissan 38,000 +14
4 Honda 27,900 +9
5 Ford 19,900 +11
6 Mazda 15,300 +27
7 Luxgen 11,000 +800
8 Hyundai 10,900 +47
9 VW 9,900 +65
10 Mercedes 9,800 +55
11 BMW 8,700 +54
12 Fuso 6,500 +70
13 Suzuki 2,900 -47
14 Volvo 2,700 +50
15 Audi 2,300 +47
16 Subaru 1,000 +170
17 Geely 1,000 New
18 Porsche 700 +90
19 GM 650 +8
20 Peugeot 550 -16
21 Proton 450 -15
22 Daihatsu 450 -40
23 Kia 450 +7
24 Saab 350 -17
25 Chery 350 New
26 Ssangyong 250 +70
27 Land Rover 200 -3
28 Chrysler 120 -50
29 Jaguar 110 +14
30 Renault 100 -7
Others 1,700
Total 319,000 +11

Toyota lost sales in a growing market, but most other brands gained to varying degrees. The Luxgen brand at #7 will sound strange to most. It is a new Taiwanese vehicle make by the Yulon company, who also assemble Nissan cars for the Taiwanese market. Luxgen already makes an MPV and an SUV model. Overall, a car market that doesn't change much.

03 November 2011

Triumph UK Car Sales: 1965-1985


Triumph motor cars were nice cars, a step up from the everyday personal transport. Quality saloon cars and stylish sports cars made up the range. The main market for them was the UK, and they sold well there. Unfortunately, BL didn't invest in the brand and it gradually died out. Below are UK sales and market share from 1965 to its demise:

1965 * 61,200 5.3%
1966 * 70,900 6.5%
1967 * 86,900 7.6%
1968 * 80,600 7.0%
1969 * 64,700 6.7%
1970 * 64,000 5.9%
1971 * 86,500 6.7%
1972 * 91,900 5.6%
1973 * 90,700 5.5%
1974 * 69,200 5.4%
1975 * 47,100 3.9%
1976 * 49,100 3.8%
1977 * 45,900 3.5%
1978 * 29,200 1.8%
1979 * 21,700 1.3%
1980 * 17,400 1.1%
1981 * 14,600 1.0%
1982 * 44,500 2.9%
1983 * 38,500 2.1%
1984 * 10,500 0.6%
1985 * * * 180 0.0%
1986 * * * 90 0.0%

The peak year of '67 saw 33,100 Herald/Vitesse, 1300 model 28,700, 2000/2500 17,000 and 8,100 sports cars sold in the UK. A sales spurt in the early 80's for the Acclaim model (based on a Honda Ballade), but then the curtain fell.

I see Triumph as a car that lived up to its name, but ultimately poor British management led to it becoming a name consigned to history. BMW currently own the name I believe, and I cannot see them doing anything with it. For those who still own one, enjoy.

To read about the Triumph car company  click here 


Pic 2500: http://triumph2000register.co.uk
Pic Dolomite: www.little-triumphs.de
Pic GT6: www.allposters.co.uk

31 October 2011

BMW vs Merc vs Audi: Germany


The sales war between the three German premium brands is intense. How that battle has played out is interesting, no more so than in the domestic market. NSU and Auto Union were separate brands but combined to become Audi in 1969. I treat them as one company - Audi - throughout. The chart shows the year, then rank in the German market, sales figure and market share:

Yr
Mercedes


BMW


Audi
1963 5 80500 6.3%
8 31400 2.5%
4 92900 7.3%
1965 4 91500 6.0%
8 34700 2.3%
5 84800 5.6%
1970 6 145500 6.9%
8 86700 4.1%
4 158500 7.5%
1975 4 175500 9.3%
5 128600 6.1%
7 107600 5.1%
1980 4 249900 10.3%
6 138900 5.7%
5 209700 8.6%
1985 3 273500 11.5%
5 144400 6.1%
6 130200 5.5%
1990 4 261400 8.6%
5 191000 6.3%
6 167500 5.5%
1995 4 250300 7.6%
5 214900 6.5%
6 206400 6.2%
2000 3 409200 12.1%
5 237800 7.0%
6 234400 6.9%
2005 3 343900 10.3%
4 263900 7.9%
5 248800 7.4%
2010 2 281200 9.6%
3 235300 8.1%
5 226900 7.8%

MB has been the leader here since the mid 60's, and BMW has been the smoothest in its progression forward - its sales gaining in every period listed. So far in 2011, all have lost market share and BMW has fallen to 4th behind Opel.

In comparison to other premium brands, in 2010 Volvo sold 25,800 (0.9%), Jaguar only 3,200 (0.1%) and Lexus merely 2,050 (0.1%). Strong bias shown here.

In summary: Germany's three premium brands have proved most successful indeed.

Quelle: Kraftfahrt–Bundesamt

28 October 2011

VW vs Opel vs Ford: Germany


There are three brands in Germany that have been the mass production car makers. Below we see the year, sales, position in the market and percentage of the market captured:

Year VW

Opel

Ford

1963 378,000 1 29.7% 302,000 2 23.7% 198,000 3 15.6%
1965 494,000 1 32.5% 331,000 2 21.8% 278,000 3 18.3%
1970 512,000 1 24.3% 406,000 2 19.2% 310,000 3 14.7%
1975 481,000 1 22.9% 382,000 2 18.2% 287,000 3 13.6%
1980 526,000 1 21.7% 406,000 2 16.7% 252,000 3 10.4%
1985 550,000 1 23.1% 368,000 2 15.5% 255,000 4 10.7%
1990 610,000 1 20.0% 522,000 2 17.2% 299,000 3 9.8%
1995 644,000 1 19.4% 561,000 2 16.9% 376,000 3 11.3%
2000 644,000 1 19.1% 412,000 2 12.2% 239,000 4 7.1%
2005 622,000 1 18.6% 348,000 2 10.4% 247,000 6 7.4%
2010 614,000 1 21.0% 234,000 3 8.0% 198,000 6 6.8%


Opel took top spot two consecutive years in the early 70's but that didn't show on the list. VW slipped in market share over the years, but has fought back recently. Opel was a real threat to VW, but now battles to fend off premium brands. Ford has failed to keep its share and is outsold by all three German premium brands.

In summary: VW is not as good as the chart indicates, but it is the real German brand and that is patriotism. Opel has recently under invested while propping up GM North America and it shows. Ford is better than its position in Germany indicates, but it obviously suffers with its image to now be so low in market share.

Quelle: Kraftfahrt–Bundesamt
Pic: www.philseed.com/rekord-a.html

18 October 2011

Nissan vs GM vs VW: Mexico

Back in the early 1990's there were only a handful of makes selling cars in Mexico.
Gradually more brands have entered the market, which they achieved by opening production facilities. Below shows how the three main players have fared. Figures from 2005 forward are sales to the public, prior are sales to distributors.

Year Nissan
GM
VW
1993 120,200 2 20.9% 104,800 3 18.2% 163,700 1 28.4%
1995 42,200 1 23.1% 41,400 2 22.7% 33,800 3 18.6%
2000 175,800 2 20.2% 212,300 1 24.4% 172,000 3 19.8%
2005 234,900 2 20.8% 249,200 1 22.0% 149,100 4 13.2%
2010 189,500 1 23.1% 155,600 2 19.0% 110,300 3 13.4%

It is not very often that Nissan can out sell big car companies like GM and VW, but in Mexico it has. Even with more brands to compete with, Nissan has increased its market share over the period above. They make reliable cars and this is obviously very important south of the border.

Last word: Nissan deserves its success in Mexico.

Sources: INEGI, AMIA.

13 October 2011

Toyota vs Holden vs Ford: Australia


Traditionally, the Australian market has been between GM Holden and Ford. Chrysler tried make it a big three but didn't succeed, as did BL. Toyota then came to the party and it was all on. They all make a large car in Australia, which has been necessary to be a real player in the market. I have data listed below going back to 1995 for each brand and sales include total vehicle sales. The year, sales, market position,  and market share are all there:

Year Toyota
Holden

Ford

1995 120,900 3 18.8% 123,000 2 19.1% 137,900 1 21.5%
2000 156,400 1 19.9% 149,800 2 19.0% 113,800 3 14.5%
2005 202,800 1 20.5% 174,500 2 17.7% 129,100 3 13.1%
2010 214,700 1 20.7% 132,900 2 11.9% 95,300 3 9.1%


The large car segment has been shrinking. Ford and Holden relied too much on this and have suffered accordingly. Toyota have done well in the 4wd and SUV sales and that is where many large car buyers have shifted to. Toyota has consolidated its market share, while the other two have plummeted. Now Ford is in danger of being overtaken by other makes, such as Mazda and Hyundai. Ford has a good range of European sourced cars, but the big Falcon is on the endangered species list.

Toyota has taken a hit with the tsunami, so 2011 hasn't been a good one for them, but they are coming back now. Holden has the strong selling Commodore now ably supported by locally made Cruze. Ford's SUV Territory model finally has a diesel motor, but Ford has not been up with the play generally. The chart says it all.